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Parallelized DNA tethered bead measurements to scrutinize DNA mechanical structure
Allemand JF, Tardin C, Salomé L.
Nat. Methods - 1;169 46-56 - doi: 10.1016/j.ymeth.2019.07.020. - 2019
Tethering beads to DNA offers a panel of single molecule techniques for the refined analysis of the conformational dynamics of DNA and the elucidation of the mechanisms of enzyme activity. Recent developments include the massive parallelization of these techniques achieved by the fabrication of dedicated nanoarrays by soft nanolithography. We focus here on two of these techniques: the Tethered Particle motion and Magnetic Tweezers allowing analysis of the behavior of individual DNA molecules in the absence of force and under the application of a force and/or a torque, respectively. We introduce the experimental protocols for the parallelization and discuss the benefits already gained, and to come, for these single molecule investigations.
Anisotropic cellular forces support mechanical integrity of the Stratum Corneum barrier
Guo S, Domanov Y, Donovan M, Ducos B, Pomeau Y, Gourier C, Perez E, Luengo GS.
Chem. Mater - 92 11-23 - doi: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2018.12.027 - 2019
The protective function of biological surfaces that are exposed to the exterior of living organisms is the result of a complex arrangement and interaction of cellular components. This is the case for the most external cornified layer of skin, the stratum corneum (SC). This layer is made of corneocytes, the elementary 'flat bricks' that are held together through adhesive junctions. Despite the well-known protective role of the SC under high mechanical stresses and rapid cell turnover, the subtleties regarding the adhesion and mechanical interaction among the individual corneocytes are still poorly known. Here, we explore the adhesion of single corneocytes at different depths of the SC, by pulling them using glass microcantilevers, and measuring their detachment forces. We measured their interplanar adhesion between SC layers, and their peripheral adhesion among cells within a SC layer. Both adhesions increased considerably with depth. At the SC surface, with respect to adhesion, the corneocyte population exhibited a strong heterogeneity, where detachment forces differed by more than one order of magnitude for corneocytes located side by side. The measured detachment forces indicated that in the upper-middle layers of SC, the peripheral adhesion was stronger than the interplanar one. We conclude that the stronger peripheral adhesion of corneocytes in the SC favors an efficient barrier which would be able to resist strong stresses.
Anisotropic cellular forces support mechanical integrity of the Stratum Corneum barrier
Guo S, Domanov Y, Donovan M, Ducos B, Pomeau Y, Gourier C, Perez E, Luengo GS.
Chem. Mater - 92 11-23 - doi: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2018.12.027 - 2019
The protective function of biological surfaces that are exposed to the exterior of living organisms is the result of a complex arrangement and interaction of cellular components. This is the case for the most external cornified layer of skin, the stratum corneum (SC). This layer is made of corneocytes, the elementary 'flat bricks' that are held together through adhesive junctions. Despite the well-known protective role of the SC under high mechanical stresses and rapid cell turnover, the subtleties regarding the adhesion and mechanical interaction among the individual corneocytes are still poorly known. Here, we explore the adhesion of single corneocytes at different depths of the SC, by pulling them using glass microcantilevers, and measuring their detachment forces. We measured their interplanar adhesion between SC layers, and their peripheral adhesion among cells within a SC layer. Both adhesions increased considerably with depth. At the SC surface, with respect to adhesion, the corneocyte population exhibited a strong heterogeneity, where detachment forces differed by more than one order of magnitude for corneocytes located side by side. The measured detachment forces indicated that in the upper-middle layers of SC, the peripheral adhesion was stronger than the interplanar one. We conclude that the stronger peripheral adhesion of corneocytes in the SC favors an efficient barrier which would be able to resist strong stresses.
PICH and TOP3A cooperate to induce positive DNA supercoiling
Anna Hélène Bizard, Jean-Francois Allemand, Tue Hassenkam, Manikandan Paramasivam
Nature - 26(4) 1 - DOI: 10.1038/s41594-019-0201-6 - 2019
All known eukaryotic topoisomerases are only able to relieve torsional stress in DNA. Nevertheless, it has been proposed that the introduction of positive DNA supercoiling is required for efficient sister-chromatid disjunction by Topoisomerase 2a during mitosis. Here we identify a eukaryotic enzymatic activity that introduces torsional stress into DNA. We show that the human Plk1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) and Topoisomerase 3a proteins combine to create an extraordinarily high density of positive DNA supercoiling. This activity, which is analogous to that of a reverse-gyrase, is apparently driven by the ability of PICH to progressively extrude hypernegatively supercoiled DNA loops that are relaxed by Topoisomerase 3a. We propose that this positive supercoiling provides an optimal substrate for the rapid disjunction of sister centromeres by Topoisomerase 2a at the onset of anaphase in eukaryotic cells.
Investigation of serum proteome homeostasis during radiation therapy by a quantitative proteomics approach
Amira Ouerhani ; Giovanni Chiappetta ; Oussema Souiai ; Halima Mahjoubi ; Joelle Vinh
Biosci Rep - 39 (7) BSR20182319 - doi.org/10.1042/BSR20182319 - 2019
The purpose of the present study is to analyze the serum proteome of patients receiving Radiation Therapy (RT) at different stages of their treatment to discovery candidate biomarkers of the radiation-induced skin lesions and the molecular pathways underlying the radiation signatures. Six stages of RT treatment were monitored from patients treated because of brain cancer: before starting the treatment, during the treatment (four time points), and at 4 weeks from the last RT dose. Serum samples were analyzed by a proteomics approach based on the Data Independent Acquisition (DIA) mass spectrometry (MS). RT induced clear changes in the expression levels of 36 serum proteins. Among these, 25 proteins were down- or up-regulated significantly before the emergence of skin lesions. Some of these were still deregulated after the completion of the treatment. Few days before the appearance of the skin lesions, the levels of some proteins involved in the wound healing processes were down-regulated. The pathway analysis indicated that after partial body irradiation, the expression levels of proteins functionally involved in the acute inflammatory and immune response, lipoprotein process and blood coagulation, were deregulated.
Development of Immobilized Enzyme Reactors for the characterization of the glycosylation heterogeneity of a protein
Stan Perchepied, Nicolas Eskenazi, Chiara Giangrande, Julien Camperi, Thierry Fournier, Joëlle Vinh, Nathalie Delaunay, Valérie Pichon
Biosci Rep - 206 120171 - doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2019.120171 - 2019
The mapping of post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins can be addressed by bottom-up proteomics strategy using proteases to achieve the enzymatic digestion of the biomolecule. Glycosylation is one of the most challenging PTM to characterize due to its large structural heterogeneity. In this work, two Immobilized Enzyme Reactors (IMERs) based on trypsin and pepsin protease were used for the first time to fasten and improve the reliability of the specific mapping of the N-glycosylation heterogeneity of glycoproteins. The performance of the supports was evaluated with the digestion of human Chorionic Gonadotropin hormone (hCG), a glycoprotein characterized by four N- and four O-glycosylation sites, prior to the analysis of the digests by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS). Firstly, the repeatability of the nanoLC-MS/MS was evaluated and a method to control the identification of the identified glycans was developed to validate them regarding the retention time of glycopeptides in reversed phase nanoLC separation. The repeatability of the digestion with trypsin-based IMER was evaluated on the same hCG batch and on three independent batches with common located glycans up to 75%. Then, the performance of the IMER digestions was compared to in-solution digestions to evaluate the qualitative mapping of the glycosylation. It has given rise to 42 out of 45 common glycans between both digestions modes. For the first time, the complementarity of trypsin and pepsin was illustrated for the glycosylation mapping as trypsin led to identifications on 2 out of 4 glycosylation site while pepsin was informative on the 4 glycosylation site. The potential of IMERs for the study of the glycosylation of a protein was illustrated with the comparison of two hCG-based drugs, Ovitrelle® and Pregnyl
Topological defects in confined populations of spindle-shaped cells
Guillaume Duclos, Christoph Erlenkämper, Jean-François Joanny & Pascal Silberzan
Nature Physics - 16 (2014) 217–223 - DOI:10.1038/nphys3876 - 2019
Most spindle-shaped cells (including smooth muscles and sarcomas) organize in vivo into well-aligned ‘nematic’ domains1, 2, 3, creating intrinsic topological defects that may be used to probe the behaviour of these active nematic systems. Active non-cellular nematics have been shown to be dominated by activity, yielding complex chaotic flows4, 5. However, the regime in which live spindle-shaped cells operate, and the importance of cell–substrate friction in particular, remains largely unexplored. Using in vitro experiments, we show that these active cellular nematics operate in a regime in which activity is effectively damped by friction, and that the interaction between defects is controlled by the system’s elastic nematic energy. Due to the activity of the cells, these defects behave as self-propelled particles and pairwise annihilate until all displacements freeze as cell crowding increases6, 7. When confined in mesoscopic circular domains, the system evolves towards two identical +1/2 disclinations facing each other. The most likely reduced positions of these defects are independent of the size of the disk, the cells’ activity or even the cell type, but are well described by equilibrium liquid crystal theory. These cell-based systems thus operate in a regime more stable than other active nematics, which may be necessary for their biological function.
Active cargo positioning in antiparallel transport networks.
Mathieu Richard, Carles Blanch-Mercader, Hajer Ennomani, Wenxiang Cao, Enrique M De La Cruz, Jean-François Joanny, Frank Jülicher, Laurent Blanchoin, Pascal Martin
Green Processing and Synthesis - - DOI : 10.1073/pnas.1900416116 - 2019
Cytoskeletal filaments assemble into dense parallel, antiparallel, or disordered networks, providing a complex environment for active cargo transport and positioning by molecular motors. The interplay between the network architecture and intrinsic motor properties clearly affects transport properties but remains poorly understood. Here, by using surface micropatterns of actin polymerization, we investigate stochastic transport properties of colloidal beads in antiparallel networks of overlapping actin filaments. We found that 200-nm beads coated with myosin Va motors displayed directed movements toward positions where the net polarity of the actin network vanished, accumulating there. The bead distribution was dictated by the spatial profiles of local bead velocity and diffusion coefficient, indicating that a diffusion-drift process was at work. Remarkably, beads coated with heavy-mero-myosin II motors showed a similar behavior. However, although velocity gradients were steeper with myosin II, the much larger bead diffusion observed with this motor resulted in less precise positioning. Our observations are well described by a 3-state model, in which active beads locally sense the net polarity of the network by frequently detaching from and reattaching to the filaments. A stochastic sequence of processive runs and diffusive searches results in a biased random walk. The precision of bead positioning is set by the gradient of net actin polarity in the network and by the run length of the cargo in an attached state. Our results unveiled physical rules for cargo transport and positioning in networks of mixed polarity.
Stiffness and tension gradients of the hair cell’s tip-link complex in the mammalian cochlea
Mélanie Tobin, Atitheb Chaiyasitdhi, Vincent Michel, Nicolas Michalski, Pascal Martin
Nature Communications - - doi: 10.7554/eLife.43473 - 2019
Frequency analysis of sound by the cochlea relies on sharp frequency tuning of mechanosensory hair cells along a tonotopic axis. To clarify the underlying biophysical mechanism, we have investigated the micromechanical properties of the hair cell’s mechanoreceptive hair bundle in the rat cochlea. We studied both inner and outer hair cells, which send nervous signals to the brain and amplify cochlear vibrations, respectively. We find that tonotopy is associated with gradients of stiffness and resting mechanical tension, with steeper gradients for outer hair cells, emphasizing the division of labor between the two hair-cell types. We demonstrate that tension in the tip links that convey force to the mechano-electrical transduction channels increases at reduced Ca2+. Finally, we reveal tonotopic gradients in stiffness and tension at the level of a single tip link. We conclude that mechanical gradients of the tip-link complex may help specify the characteristic frequency of the hair cell.

SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The tip-link complex of the hair cell is mechanically tuned along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea.

An intrinsically disordered region in OSBP acts as an entropic barrier to control protein dynamics and orientation at membrane contact sites
Jamecna D, Polidori DJ, Mesmin B, Dezi M, Lévy D, Bigay J, Antonny B
Dev Cell - - DOI : 10.1016/j.devcel.2019.02.021 - 2019
Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) acting at membrane contact sites (MCS) between the ER and other organelles contain domains involved in heterotypic (e.g. ER to Golgi) membrane tethering as well as domains involved in lipid transfer. Here, we show that a long ≈ 90 aa intrinsically unfolded sequence at the N-terminus of oxysterol binding protein (OSBP) controls OSBP orientation and dynamics at MCS. This Gly-Pro-Ala-rich sequence, whose hydrodynamic radius is twice as that of folded domains, prevents the two PH domains of the OSBP dimer from homotypically tethering two Golgi-like membranes and considerably facilitates OSBP in-plane diffusion and recycling at MCS. Although quite distant in sequence, the N-terminus of OSBP-related protein-4 (ORP4) has similar effects. We propose that N-terminal sequences of low complexity in ORPs form an entropic barrier that restrains protein orientation, limits protein density and facilitates protein mobility in the narrow and crowded MCS environment.


405 publications.