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Abnormal recruitment of extracellular matrix proteins by excess Notch3ECD: a new pathomechanism in CADASIL
Monet-Leprêtre M, Haddad I, Baron-Menguy C, Fouillot-Panchal M, Riani M, Domenga-Denier V, Dussaule C, Cognat E, Vinh J and Joutel A
Brain Oxford - (Pt 6) 1830-45 - DOI: 10.1093/brain/awt092 - 2013
Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, one of the most common inherited small vessel diseases of the brain, is characterized by a progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix accumulation. The disease is caused by highly stereotyped mutations within the extracellular domain of the NOTCH3 receptor (Notch3(ECD)) that result in an odd number of cysteine residues. While CADASIL-associated NOTCH3 mutations differentially affect NOTCH3 receptor function and activity, they all are associated with early accumulation of Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates in small vessels. We still lack mechanistic explanation to link NOTCH3 mutations with small vessel pathology. Herein, we hypothesized that excess Notch3(ECD) could recruit and sequester functionally important proteins within small vessels of the brain. We performed biochemical, nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunohistochemical analyses, using cerebral and arterial tissue derived from patients with CADASIL and mouse models of CADASIL that exhibit vascular lesions in the end- and early-stage of the disease, respectively. Biochemical fractionation of brain and artery samples demonstrated that mutant Notch3(ECD) accumulates in disulphide cross-linked detergent-insoluble aggregates in mice and patients with CADASIL. Further proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses identified two functionally important extracellular matrix proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) and vitronectin (VTN) that are sequestered into Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates. Using cultured cells, we show that increased levels or aggregation of Notch3 enhances the formation of Notch3(ECD)-TIMP3 complex, promoting TIMP3 recruitment and accumulation. In turn, TIMP3 promotes complex formation including NOTCH3 and VTN. In vivo, brain vessels from mice and patients with CADASIL exhibit elevated levels of both insoluble cross-linked and soluble TIMP3 species. Moreover, reverse zymography assays show a significant elevation of TIMP3 activity in the brain vessels from mice and patients with CADASIL. Collectively, our findings lend support to a Notch3(ECD) cascade hypothesis in CADASIL disease pathology, which posits that aggregation/accumulation of Notch3(ECD) in the brain vessels is a central event, promoting the abnormal recruitment of functionally important extracellular matrix proteins that may ultimately cause multifactorial toxicity. Specifically, our results suggest a dysregulation of TIMP3 activity, which could contribute to mutant Notch3(ECD) toxicity by impairing extracellular matrix homeostasis in small vessels.
Landscape of protein–protein interactions in Drosophila immune deficiency signaling during bacterial challenge
Hidehiro Fukuyamaa, Yann Verdierb, Yongsheng Guana, Chieko Makino-Okamuraa, Victoria Shilovaa, Xi Liua, E. Maksouda, J. Matsubayashia, I. Haddadb, K. Spirohne, K. Onof, C. Hetruc, J. Rossierb, Trey Idekerf, M. Boutrose, Joëlle Vinh and Jules A. Hoffmann
Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA - vol.110(n°26) 10717–22 - DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1304380110 - 2013
The Drosophila defense against pathogens largely relies on the activation of two signaling pathways: immune deficiency (IMD) and Toll. The IMD pathway is triggered mainly by Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the Toll pathway responds predominantly to Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The activation of these pathways leads to the rapid induction of numerous NF-κB–induced immune response genes, including antimicrobial peptide genes. The IMD pathway shows significant similarities with the TNF receptor pathway. Recent evidence indicates that the IMD pathway is also activated in response to various noninfectious stimuli (i.e., inflammatory-like reactions). To gain a better understanding of the molecular machinery underlying the pleiotropic functions of this pathway, we first performed a comprehensive proteomics analysis to identify the proteins interacting with the 11 canonical members of the pathway initially identified by genetic studies. We identified 369 interacting proteins (corresponding to 291 genes) in heat-killed Escherichia coli-stimulated Drosophila S2 cells, 92% of which have human orthologs. A comparative analysis of gene ontology from fly or human gene annotation databases points to four significant common categories: (i) the NuA4, nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4, histone acetyltransferase complex, (ii) the switching defective/sucrose nonfermenting-type chromatin remodeling complex, (iii) transcription coactivator activity, and (iv) translation factor activity. Here we demonstrate that sumoylation of the IκB kinase homolog immune response-deficient 5 plays an important role in the induction of antimicrobial peptide genes through a highly conserved sumoylation consensus site during bacterial challenge. Taken together, the proteomics data presented here provide a unique avenue for a comparative functional analysis of proteins involved in innate immune reactions in flies and mammals.
Emergence of collective modes and tridimensional structures from epithelial confinement
M. Deforet, V. Hakim, H.G. Yevick, G. Duclos and P. Silberzan
Nature Communications - Vol.5 (n°3747) - DOI:10.1038/ncomms4747 - 2013
Many in vivo processes, including morphogenesis or tumour maturation, involve small populations of cells within a spatially restricted region. However, the basic mechanisms underlying the dynamics of confined cell assemblies remain largely to be deciphered and would greatly benefit from well-controlled in vitro experiments. Here we show that confluent epithelial cells cultured on finite population-sized domains, exhibit collective low-frequency radial displacement modes as well as stochastic global rotation reversals. A simple mathematical model, in which cells are described as persistent random walkers that adapt their motion to that of their neighbours, captures the essential characteristics of these breathing oscillations. As these epithelia mature, a tri-dimensional peripheral cell cord develops at the domain edge by differential extrusion, as a result of the additional degrees of freedom of the border cells. These results demonstrate that epithelial confinement alone can induce morphogenesis-like processes including spontaneous collective pulsations and transition from 2D to 3D.
Collective Cell Motion in an Epithelial Sheet Can Be Quantitatively Described by a Stochastic Interacting
Particle Model, Nestor Sepu lveda, Laurence Petit-jean, Olivier Cochet, Erwan Grasland-Mongrain, Pascal Silberzan and Vincent Hakim
PLoS Comp. Biol. - 10(6) e1003717 - DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003717 - 2013
Modelling the displacement of thousands of cells that move in a collective way is required for the simulation and the theoretical analysis of various biological processes. Here, we tackle this question in the controlled setting where the motion of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells in a confluent epithelium is triggered by the unmasking of free surface. We develop a simple model in which cells are described as point particles with a dynamic based on the two premises that, first, cells move in a stochastic manner and, second, tend to adapt their motion to that of their neighbors. Detailed comparison to experimental data show that the model provides a quantitatively accurate description of cell motion in the epithelium bulk at early times. In addition, inclusion of model “leader” cells with modified characteristics, accounts for the digitated shape of the interface which develops over the subsequent hours, providing that leader cells invade free surface more easily than other cells and coordinate their motion with their followers. The previously-described progression of the epithelium border is reproduced by the model and quantitatively explained.
Cellular capsules as a tool for multicellular spheroid production and for investigating the mechanics of tumor progression in vitro
K. Alessandri, Bibhu Ranjan Sarangi, V. Valérïévitch Gurchenkov, B. Sinha, T. Kissling, L. Fetler, F. Rico, Simon Scheuring, Christophe Lamaze, S. Geraldo, D. Vignjević, H. Doméjean, L. Rolland, A. Funfak, Jérôme Bibette, Nicolas Bremond, Pierre Nas
Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA - vol.110(n°37) 14843–48 - DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1309482110 - 2013
Deciphering the multifactorial determinants of tumor progression requires standardized high-throughput preparation of 3D in vitro cellular assays. We present a simple microfluidic method based on the encapsulation and growth of cells inside permeable, elastic, hollow microspheres. We show that this approach enables mass production of size-controlled multicellular spheroids. Due to their geometry and elasticity, these microcapsules can uniquely serve as quantitative mechanical sensors to measure the pressure exerted by the expanding spheroid. By monitoring the growth of individual encapsulated spheroids after confluence, we dissect the dynamics of pressure buildup toward a steady-state value, consistent with the concept of homeostatic pressure. In turn, these confining conditions are observed to increase the cellular density and affect the cellular organization of the spheroid. Postconfluent spheroids exhibit a necrotic core cemented by a blend of extracellular material and surrounded by a rim of proliferating hypermotile cells. By performing invasion assays in a collagen matrix, we report that peripheral cells readily escape preconfined spheroids and cell–cell cohesivity is maintained for freely growing spheroids, suggesting that mechanical cues from the surrounding microenvironment may trigger cell invasion from a growing tumor. Overall, our technology offers a unique avenue to produce in vitro cell-based assays useful for developing new anticancer therapies and to investigate the interplay between mechanics and growth in tumor evolution.
Influence of Size, Surface Coating and Fine Chemical Composition on the In Vitro Reactivity and In Vivo Biodistribution of Lipid Nanocapsules Versus Lipid Nanoemulsions in Cancer Models
Samuli Hirsjärvi, Sandrine Dufort, Julien Gravier, Isabelle Texier, Qiao Yan, Jérome Bibette, Lucie Sancey, Véronique Josserand, Catherine Passirani, Jean-Pierre Benoit and Jean-Luc Coll
Nanomed. Nanotech. Biol. and Med. - 9(3) 375-87 - DOI: 10.1016/j.nano.2012.08.005 - 2013
Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) and lipid nanoemulsions (LNEs) are biomimetic synthetic nanocarriers. Their in vitro and in vivo performance was evaluated as a function of their size (25, 50 and 100 nm) and the surface PEG chain length. Analysis methods included complement activation test, particle uptake in macrophage and HEK293(β3) cells and biodistribution studies with tumor-grafted mice by fluorescence imaging. A particular attention was paid to keep the concentration of each nanocarrier and to the amount of fluorescent dye in comparable conditions between the in vitro and in vivo studies. Under these conditions, no significant differences were found among the three tested particle sizes and the two nanocarrier types. Longer PEG chains on the LNE surface provided better stealth properties, whereas PEG modification on the LNC formulations inhibited the production of stable nanocarriers. Passive accumulation of LNCs and LNEs in different tumor types depended on the degree of tumor vascularization.
Single-cell analysis and sorting using droplet-based microfluidics
Linas Mazutis, John Gilbert, W Lloyd Ung, David A Weitz, Andrew D Griffiths and John A Heyman
Nature Protocols - -8 870–891 - DOI: 10.1038/nprot.2013.046 - 2013
We present a droplet-based microfluidics protocol for high-throughput analysis and sorting of single cells. Compartmentalization of single cells in droplets enables the analysis of proteins released from or secreted by cells, thereby overcoming one of the major limitations of traditional flow cytometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. As an example of this approach, we detail a binding assay for detecting antibodies secreted from single mouse hybridoma cells. Secreted antibodies are detected after only 15 min by co-compartmentalizing single mouse hybridoma cells, a fluorescent probe and single beads coated with anti-mouse IgG antibodies in 50-pl droplets. The beads capture the secreted antibodies and, when the captured antibodies bind to the probe, the fluorescence becomes localized on the beads, generating a clearly distinguishable fluorescence signal that enables droplet sorting at ∼200 Hz as well as cell enrichment. The microfluidic system described is easily adapted for screening other intracellular, cell-surface or secreted proteins and for quantifying catalytic or regulatory activities. In order to screen ∼1 million cells, the microfluidic operations require 2–6 h; the entire process, including preparation of microfluidic devices and mammalian cells, requires 5–7 d.
Multiplex Picodroplet Digital PCR to Detect KRAS Mutations in Circulating DNA from the Plasma of Colorectal Cancer Patients
Valerie Taly, Deniz Pekin, Leonor Benhaim, Steve K. Kotsopoulos, Delphine Le Corre, Xinyu Li, Ivan Atochin, Darren R. Link, Andrew D. Griffiths, Karine Pallier, Hélène Blons, Olivier Bouche, Bruno Landi, J. Brian Hutchison, and Pierre Laurent-Puig
Clin. Chem. - 59(12) 1722-31 - DOI: 10.1373/clinchem.2013.206359 - 2013
BACKGROUND: Multiplex digital PCR (dPCR) enables noninvasive and sensitive detection of circulating tumor DNA with performance unachievable by current molecular-detection approaches. Furthermore, picodroplet dPCR facilitates simultaneous screening for multiple mutations from the same sample.

METHODS: We investigated the utility of multiplex dPCR to screen for the 7 most common mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) oncogene from plasma samples of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Fifty plasma samples were tested from patients for whom the primary tumor biopsy tissue DNA had been characterized by quantitative PCR.

RESULTS: Tumor characterization revealed that 19 patient tumors had KRAS mutations. Multiplex dPCR analysis of the plasma DNA prepared from these samples identified 14 samples that matched the mutation identified in the tumor, 1 sample contained a different KRAS mutation, and 4 samples had no detectable mutation. Among the tumor samples that were wild type for KRAS, 2 KRAS mutations were identified in the corresponding plasma samples. Duplex dPCR (i.e., wild-type and single-mutation assay) was also used to analyze plasma samples from patients with KRAS-mutated tumors and 5 samples expected to contain the BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) V600E mutation. The results for the duplex analysis matched those for the multiplex analysis for KRAS-mutated samples and, owing to its higher sensitivity, enabled detection of 2 additional samples with low levels of KRAS-mutated DNA. All 5 samples with BRAF mutations were detected.

CONCLUSIONS: This work demonstrates the clinical utility of multiplex dPCR to screen for multiple mutations simultaneously with a sensitivity sufficient to detect mutations in circulating DNA obtained by noninvasive blood collection.
Enhanced imine synthesis in water: from surfactantmediated catalysis to host–guest mechanisms
Kamel Meguellati, Ali Fallah-Araghi, Jean-Christophe Baret, Abdeslam El Harrak, Thomas Mangeat, Carlos M. Marques, Andrew D. Griffiths and Sylvain Ladame
Chem. Comm. - 49 11332-34 - DOI: 10.1039/C3CC46461J - 2013
An environment-responsive and fluorogenic reaction is reported and used as a model system to demonstrate experimentally three mechanisms of enhanced imine synthesis in water using either surfactants (below and above their CMC) or double-stranded DNA (acting as a reaction host).
Enhanced chemical synthesis at soft interfaces: a universal reaction-adsorption mechanism in microcompartments
A. Fallah-Araghi, K. Meguellati, J.-C. Baret, A. El Harrak, T. Mangeat, M. Karplus, S. Ladame, C. M. Marques and A.D. Griffiths
Phys. Rev. Lett. - 112 28301 - DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.028301 - 2013
A bimolecular synthetic reaction (imine synthesis) was performed compartmentalized in micrometer-diameter emulsion droplets. The apparent equilibrium constant (Keq) and apparent forward rate constant (k1) were both inversely proportional to the droplet radius. The results are explained by a noncatalytic reaction-adsorption model in which reactants adsorb to the droplet interface with relatively low binding energies of a few kBT, react and diffuse back to the bulk. Reaction thermodynamics is therefore modified by compartmentalization at the mesoscale—without confinement on the molecular scale—leading to a universal mechanism for improving unfavorable reactions.

326 publications.