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- Pour toute publication de résultats ayant reçu l’aide de l’IPGG (présence dans les locaux de l’IPGG, passage sur la plateforme technologique de l’IPGG, collaboration inter équipes IPGG, lié à une bourse doctorale ou postdoctorale IPGG, ou encore utilisation des espaces communs), il vous faut indiquer  cette phrase « Ce travail a été réalisé avec le soutien du laboratoire d’excellence Institut Pierre-Gilles de Gennes (programme Investissements d’avenir ANR-10-IDEX-0001-02 PSL et ANR-10-LABX-31). » / « This work has received the support of "Institut Pierre-Gilles de Gennes" (laboratoire d’excellence, “Investissements d’avenir” program ANR-10-IDEX-0001-02 PSL and ANR-10-LABX-31.). ».

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Liquid-liquid coffee-ring effect.
Vincent Poulichet,Mathieu Morel,Sergii Rudiuk,Damien Baigl
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science - - DOI: 10.1016/j.jcis.2020.03.094 - 2020
The so-called coffee-ring effect (CRE) is extraordinarily common, problematic in industry and attractively puzzling for researchers, with the accepted rule that it requires two key-ingredients: solvent evaporation and contact line pinning. Here, we demonstrate that the CRE also occurs when the solvent of a pinned sessile drop transfers into another liquid, without involving any evaporation. We show that it shares all characteristic features of the evaporative CRE: solvent transfer-driven transport of solutes to the contact line, ring-shaped deposit, closely-packed particle organization at the contact line, and size-dependent particle sorting. We thus suggest expanding the definition of the coffee-ring effect to any pinned drop having its solvent transferring to an outer medium where the drop compounds cannot be dissolved.
Liquid-liquid coffee-ring effect
Vincent Poulichet,Mathieu Morel,Sergii Rudiuk,Damien Baigl
X-MOL - - DOI: 10.1016/j.jcis.2020.03.094 - 2020
The so-called coffee-ring effect (CRE) is extraordinarily common, problematic in industry and attractively puzzling for researchers, with the accepted rule that it requires two key-ingredients: solvent evaporation and contact line pinning. Here, we demonstrate that the CRE also occurs when the solvent of a pinned sessile drop transfers into another liquid, without involving any evaporation. We show that it shares all characteristic features of the evaporative CRE: solvent transfer-driven transport of solutes to the contact line, ring-shaped deposit, closely-packed particle organization at the contact line, and size-dependent particle sorting. We thus suggest expanding the definition of the coffee-ring effect to any pinned drop having its solvent transferring to an outer medium where the drop compounds cannot be dissolved.
Self-Propelled Water Drops on Bare Glass Substrates in Air: Fast, Controllable, and Easy Transport Powered by Surfactants
Pauline E. Galy, Sergii Rudiuk, Mathieu Morel, and Damien Baigl
Langmuir - 36, 25 6916–6923 - doi : 10.1021/acs.langmuir.9b03727 - 2020
Self-propelled drops are capable of motion without external intervention. As such, they constitute attractive entities for fundamental investigations in active soft matter, hydrodynamics, and surface sciences, as well as promising systems for autonomous microfluidic operations. In contrast with most of the examples relying on organic drops or specifically treated substrates, here we describe the first system of nonreactive water drops in air that can propel themselves on a commercially available ordinary glass substrate that was used as received. This is achieved by exploiting the dynamic adsorption behavior of common n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (CnTAB) surfactants added to the drop. We precisely analyze the drop motion for a broad series of surfactants carrying n = 6 to 18 carbon atoms in their tail and establish how the motion characteristics (speed, probability of motion) are tuned by both the hydrophobicity and the concentration of the surfactant. We show that motion occurs regardless of the n value but only in a specific concentration range with a maximum speed at around one tenth of the critical micelle concentration (CMC/10) for most of the tested surfactants. Surfactants of intermediate hydrophobicity are shown to be the best candidates to power drops that can move at a high speed (1–10 cm s–1), the optimal performance being reached with [C12TAB] = 800 μM. We propose a mechanism where the motion originates from the anisotropic wettability of the substrate created by the electrostatic adsorption of surfactants beneath the moving drop. Simply drawing lines with a marker pen allows us to create guiding paths for drop motion and to achieve operations such as complex trajectory control, programmed drop fusion, drop refilling, as well as drop moving vertically against gravity. This work revisits the role of surfactants in dynamic wetting and self-propelled motion as well as brings an original strategy to build the future of microfluidics with lower-cost, simpler, and more autonomous portable devices that could be made available to everyone and everywhere.

From bulk crystallization of inorganic nanoparticles at the air/water interface: tunable organization and intense structural colors
Jacopo Vialetto,Sergii Rudiuk,Mathieu Morel,Damien Baigl
Nanoscale - 36, 25 6916–6923 - DOI: 10.1039/c9nr10965j - 2020
The "flipping method" is a new straightforward way to both adsorb and organize microparticles at a liquid interface, with ultralow amounts of a surfactant and no other external forces than gravity. Here we demonstrate that it allows the adsorption of a variety of inorganic nanoparticles at an air/water interface, in an organized way, which is directly controlled by the surfactant concentration, ranging from amorphous to highly crystalline two-dimensional assemblies. With micromolar amounts of a conventional cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, DTAB), nanoparticles of different compositions (silica, silver, and gold), sizes (down to 100 nm) and shapes (spheres and cubes) adsorb from the bulk and directly organize at the air/water interface, resulting in marked optical properties such as reflectivity or intense structural coloration.

An Epigenetic Priming Mechanism Mediated by Nutrient Sensing Regulates Transcriptional Output
Natalia Stec, Katja Doerfel, Kelly Hills-Muckey, Victoria M. Ettorre, Sevinc Ercan, Wolfgang Keil, C. M. Hammell
bioRxiv - - doi.org/10.1101/2020.09.01.278127 - 2020
While precise tuning of gene expression levels is critical for most developmental pathways, the mechanisms by which the transcriptional output of dosage-sensitive molecules is established or modulated by the environment remain poorly understood. Here, we provide a mechanistic framework for how the conserved transcription factor BLMP-1/Blimp1 operates as a pioneer factor to decompact chromatin near its target loci hours before transcriptional activation and by doing so, regulates both the duration and amplitude of subsequent target gene transcription. This priming mechanism is genetically separable from the mechanisms that establish the timing of transcriptional induction and functions to canalize aspects of cell-fate specification, animal size regulation, and molting. A key feature of the BLMP-1-dependent transcriptional priming mechanism is that chromatin decompaction is initially established during embryogenesis and maintained throughout larval development by nutrient sensing. This anticipatory mechanism integrates transcriptional output with environmental conditions and is essential for resuming normal temporal patterning after animals exit nutrient-mediated developmental arrests.
High-throughput single-cell activity-based screening and sequencing of antibodies using droplet microfluidics
Annabelle Gérard, Adam Woolfe, Guillaume Mottet, Marcel Reichen, Carlos Castrillon, Vera Menrath, Sami Ellouze, Adeline Poitou, Raphaël Doineau, Luis Briseno-Roa, Pablo Canales-Herrerias, Pascaline Mary, Gregory Rose, Charina Ortega, Matthieu Delincé, So
Nature Biotechnology - 38 715–721 - doi.org/10.1038/s41587-020-0466-7 - 2020
Mining the antibody repertoire of plasma cells and plasmablasts could enable the discovery of useful antibodies for therapeutic or research purposes1. We present a method for high-throughput, single-cell screening of IgG-secreting primary cells to characterize antibody binding to soluble and membrane-bound antigens. CelliGO is a droplet microfluidics system that combines high-throughput screening for IgG activity, using fluorescence-based in-droplet single-cell bioassays2, with sequencing of paired antibody V genes, using in-droplet single-cell barcoded reverse transcription. We analyzed IgG repertoire diversity, clonal expansion and somatic hypermutation in cells from mice immunized with a vaccine target, a multifunctional enzyme or a membrane-bound cancer target. Immunization with these antigens yielded 100–1,000 IgG sequences per mouse. We generated 77 recombinant antibodies from the identified sequences and found that 93% recognized the soluble antigen and 14% the membrane antigen. The platform also allowed recovery of ~450–900 IgG sequences from ~2,200 IgG-secreting activated human memory B cells, activated ex vivo, demonstrating its versatility.
The generality of transient compartmentalization and its associated error thresholds
Alex Blokhuis, Philippe Nghe , Luca Peliti , David Lacoste
J Theor Biol . - 487 110110 - doi: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2019.110110 - 2020
Can prelife proceed without cell division? A recently proposed mechanism suggests that transient compartmentalization could have preceded cell division in prebiotic scenarios. Here, we study transient compartmentalization dynamics in the presence of mutations and noise in replication, as both can be detrimental the survival of compartments. Our study comprises situations where compartments contain uncoupled autocatalytic reactions feeding on a common resource, and systems based on RNA molecules copied by replicases, following a recent experimental study. Using the theory of branching processes, we show analytically that two regimes are possible. In the diffusion-limited regime, replication is asynchronous which leads to a large variability in the composition of compartments. In contrast, in a replication-limited regime, the growth is synchronous and thus the compositional variability is low. Typically, simple autocatalysts are in the former regime, while polymeric replicators can access the latter. For deterministic growth dynamics, we introduce mutations that turn functional replicators into parasites. We derive the phase boundary separating coexistence or parasite dominance as a function of relative growth, inoculation size and mutation rate. We show that transient compartmentalization allows coexistence beyond the classical error threshold, above which the parasite dominates. Our findings invite to revisit major prebiotic transitions, notably the transitions towards cooperation, complex polymers and cell division.
Predicting Evolution Using Regulatory Architecture
Philippe Nghe , Marjon G J de Vos , Enzo Kingma , Manjunatha Kogenaru , Frank J Poelwijk , Liedewij Laan , Sander J Tans
Annu Rev Biophys - 6(49) 181-197 - doi: 10.1146/annurev-biophys-070317-032939 - 2020
The limits of evolution have long fascinated biologists. However, the causes of evolutionary constraint have remained elusive due to a poor mechanistic understanding of studied phenotypes. Recently, a range of innovative approaches have leveraged mechanistic information on regulatory networks and cellular biology. These methods combine systems biology models with population and single-cell quantification and with new genetic tools, and they have been applied to a range of complex cellular functions and engineered networks. In this article, we review these developments, which are revealing the mechanistic causes of epistasis at different levels of biological organization-in molecular recognition, within a single regulatory network, and between different networks-providing first indications of predictable features of evolutionary constraint.

Metabolic cost of rapid adaptation of single yeast cells
Gabrielle Woronoff, Philippe Nghe, Jean Baudry, Laurent Boitard, Erez Bra
PNAS - 117 (20) 10660-10666 - doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1913767117 - 2020
We establish, using single-cell analysis of metabolism and division in a droplet microfluidic system, that yeast can adapt, resuming division, extremely rapidly to an unforeseen environmental challenge, and that adaptation is an active process, requiring the consumption of a characteristic amount energy. The adapted state is stable over at least several days, showing that this is a genuine adaptation process. The adaptation rate (10−3 cells per hour) is orders of magnitude higher than expected based on known mutation rates, suggesting an epigenetic origin, and the tight energetic coupling implies that there is active exploration of different states, and fixation of the solution(s) that allow adaptation.


Flux, toxicity and protein expression costs shape genetic interaction in a metabolic pathways
Gabrielle Woronoff, Philippe Nghe, Jean Baudry, Laurent Boitard, Erez Bra
Science Advances - 6 23 - DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abb2236 - 2020
Our ability to predict the impact of mutations on traits relevant for disease and evolution remains severely limited by the dependence of their effects on the genetic background and environment. Even when molecular interactions between genes are known, it is unclear how these translate to organism-level interactions between alleles. We therefore characterized the interplay of genetic and environmental dependencies in determining fitness by quantifying ~4000 fitness interactions between expression variants of two metabolic genes, starting from various environmentally modulated expression levels. We detect a remarkable variety of interactions dependent on initial expression levels and demonstrate that they can be quantitatively explained by a mechanistic model accounting for catabolic flux, metabolite toxicity, and expression costs. Complex fitness interactions between mutations can therefore be predicted simply from their simultaneous impact on a few connected molecular phenotypes.




635 publications.