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Microfluidic model of the platelet-generating organ: beyond bone marrow biomimetics
Antoine Blin, Anne Le Goff, Aurélie Magniez, Sonia Poirault-Chassac, Bruno Teste, Géraldine Sicot, Kim Anh Nguyen, Feriel S. Hamdi, Mathilde Reyssat & Dominique Baruch
Nature - Scientific Reports 6 21700 - DOI: 10.1038/srep21700 - 2016
We present a new, rapid method for producing blood platelets in vitro from cultured megakaryocytes based on a microfluidic device. This device consists in a wide array of VWF-coated micropillars. Such pillars act as anchors on megakaryocytes, allowing them to remain trapped in the device and subjected to hydrodynamic shear. The combined effect of anchoring and shear induces the elongation of megakaryocytes and finally their rupture into platelets and proplatelets. This process was observed with megakaryocytes from different origins and found to be robust. This original bioreactor design allows to process megakaryocytes at high throughput (millions per hour). Since platelets are produced in such a large amount, their extensive biological characterisation is possible and shows that platelets produced in this bioreactor are functional.
Innate control of actin nucleation determines two distinct migration behaviours in dendritic cells.
Vargas P, Maiuri P, Bretou M, Sáez PJ, Pierobon P, Maurin M, Chabaud M, Lankar D, Obino D, Terriac E, Raab M, Thiam H-R, Brocker T, Kitchen-Goosen SM, Alberts AS, Sunareni P, Xia S, Li R, Voituriez R, Piel M, Lennon-Duménil A-M
Nat. Cell Biol. - 18(1): 43-53 - DOI: 10.1016/j.jim.2015.12.005 - 2016
Dendritic cell (DC) migration in peripheral tissues serves two main functions: antigen sampling by immature DCs, and chemokine-guided migration towards lymphatic vessels (LVs) on maturation. These migratory events determine the efficiency of the adaptive immune response. Their regulation by the core cell locomotion machinery has not been determined. Here, we show that the migration of immature DCs depends on two main actin pools: a RhoA-mDia1-dependent actin pool located at their rear, which facilitates forward locomotion; and a Cdc42-Arp2/3-dependent actin pool present at their front, which limits migration but promotes antigen capture. Following TLR4-MyD88-induced maturation, Arp2/3-dependent actin enrichment at the cell front is markedly reduced. Consequently, mature DCs switch to a faster and more persistent mDia1-dependent locomotion mode that facilitates chemotactic migration to LVs and lymph nodes. Thus, the differential use of actin-nucleating machineries optimizes the migration of immature and mature DCs according to their specific function.
Deterministic patterns in cell motility
Ido Lavi, Matthieu Piel, Ana-Maria Lennon-Duménil , Raphaël Voituriez and Nir S. Gov
Nature Physics - 12 1146–1152 - DOI: : 10.1038/NPHYS3836 - 2016
Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.
On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets
D. Molino, S. Quignard, C. Gruget, F. Pincet, Y. Chen, M. Piel & J. Fattaccioli
Scientific Reports - 6 29113 - DOI: 10.1038/srep29113 - 2016
The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement.
Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities
Francesca Fiorini, Debjani Bagchi, Hervé Le Hir and Vincent Croquette
Nature Communications - Volume 6 (2015) Article number: 7581 - doi:10.1038/ncomms8581 - 2015
RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery.
Two-step local functionalization of fluoropolymer Dyneon THV microfluidic materials by scanning electrochemical microscopy combined to click reaction
Cyrine Slim, Eva Ratajovà, Sophie Griveau, Frédéric Kanoufi, David Ferraro, Camille Perréard, Fanny d’Orlyé, Anne Varenne and Fethi Bedioui
Electrochemistry Communications - 60 (5–8) - doi:10.1016/j.elecom.2015.07.019 - 2015
We propose an original two-step strategy combining the use of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and molecular chemistry via a “click” reaction (copper (I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC)) to locally functionalize Dyneon THV surfaces, an attractive fluoropolymer for microfluidic applications. The first step consists in the local reduction of THV using a SECM tip to activate the surface by the creation of a locally carbonized zone and notably the formation of surface alkyne functions. This is then followed by a direct CuAAC reaction with an azide-bearing ligand for its local immobilization. The proof of concept is demonstrated by efficient local functionalization of the substrate with a fluorescent dye stable up to 6 months. Surface modifications were characterized by IR-ATR, XPS, and fluorescence microscopy.
Dynamics of CRISPR-Cas9 genome interrogation in living cells
Knight SC, Xie L, Deng W, Guglielmi B, Witkowsky LB, Bosanac L, Zhang ET, El Beheiry M, Masson J-B, Dahan M, Liu Z, Doudna JA, Tjian R
Science - 350(6262) 823-6 - DOI: 10.1126/science.aac6572 - 2015
The RNA-guided CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is used for genome editing, transcriptional modulation, and live-cell imaging. Cas9-guide RNA complexes recognize and cleave double-stranded DNA sequences on the basis of 20-nucleotide RNA-DNA complementarity, but the mechanism of target searching in mammalian cells is unknown. Here, we use single-particle tracking to visualize diffusion and chromatin binding of Cas9 in living cells. We show that three-dimensional diffusion dominates Cas9 searching in vivo, and off-target binding events are, on average, short-lived (<1 second). Searching is dependent on the local chromatin environment, with less sampling and slower movement within heterochromatin. These results reveal how the bacterial Cas9 protein interrogates mammalian genomes and navigates eukaryotic chromatin structure.
Droplets in Microchannels: Dynamical Properties of the Lubrication Film
Axel Huerre, Olivier Theodoly, Alexander M. Leshansky, Marie-Pierre Valignat, Isabelle Cantat and Marie-Caroline Jullien
Phys. Rev. Lett. - 115 (064501) 064501 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.064501 - 2015
We study the motion of droplets in a confined, micrometric geometry, by focusing on the lubrication film between a droplet and a wall. When capillary forces dominate, the lubrication film thickness evolves nonlinearly with the capillary number due to the viscous dissipation between the meniscus and the wall. However, this film may become thin enough (tens of nanometers) that intermolecular forces come into play and affect classical scalings. Our experiments yield highly resolved topographies of the shape of the interface and allow us to bring new insights into droplet dynamics in microfluidics. We report the novel characterization of two dynamical regimes as the capillary number increases: (i) at low capillary numbers, the film thickness is constant and set by the disjoining pressure, while (ii) above a critical capillary number, the interface behavior is well described by a viscous scenario. At a high surfactant concentration, structural effects lead to the formation of patterns on the interface, which can be used to trace the interface velocity, that yield direct confirmation of the boundary condition in the viscous regime.
Optical volume and mass measurements show that mammalian cells swell during mitosis.
Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz E, Monnier S, Cappello G, Le Berre M, Piel M
J. Cell Biol. - 211( 4): 765-74 - DOI: 10.1016/j.jim.2015.12.005 - 2015
The extent, mechanism, and function of cell volume changes during specific cellular events, such as cell migration and cell division, have been poorly studied, mostly because of a lack of adequate techniques. Here we unambiguously report that a large range of mammalian cell types display a significant increase in volume during mitosis (up to 30%). We further show that this increase in volume is tightly linked to the mitotic state of the cell and not to its spread or rounded shape and is independent of the presence of an intact actomyosin cortex. Importantly, this volume increase is not accompanied by an increase in dry mass and thus corresponds to a decrease in cell density. This mitotic swelling might have important consequences for mitotic progression: it might contribute to produce strong pushing forces, allowing mitotic cells to round up; it might also, by lowering cytoplasmic density, contribute to the large change of physicochemical properties observed in mitotic cells.
Actin Flows Mediate a Universal Coupling between Cell Speed and Cell Persistence.
Maiuri P, Rupprecht J-F, Wieser S, Ruprecht V, Bénichou O, Carpi N, Coppey M, De Beco S, Gov N, Heisenberg C-P, Lage Crespo C, Lautenschlaeger F, Le Berre M, Lennon-Dumenil A-M, Raab M, Thiam H-R, Piel M, Sixt M, Voituriez R
Cell - 161(2) 374-86 - DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.01.056 - 2015
Cell movement has essential functions in development, immunity, and cancer. Various cell migration patterns have been reported, but no general rule has emerged so far. Here, we show on the basis of experimental data in vitro and in vivo that cell persistence, which quantifies the straightness of trajectories, is robustly coupled to cell migration speed. We suggest that this universal coupling constitutes a generic law of cell migration, which originates in the advection of polarity cues by an actin cytoskeleton undergoing flows at the cellular scale. Our analysis relies on a theoretical model that we validate by measuring the persistence of cells upon modulation of actin flow speeds and upon optogenetic manipulation of the binding of an actin regulator to actin filaments. Beyond the quantitative prediction of the coupling, the model yields a generic phase diagram of cellular trajectories, which recapitulates the full range of observed migration patterns.

289 publications.